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Lab Safety Web Site Report

Problem
Analysis
Rationale
Results
Evidence
Reflection
Competencies
Blueprint

Problem Statement
in December of 2002, the University of Colorado requested the Center for Innovations in Teaching and Learning Technologies (CITT) to create a standardized method of training lab workers. This project, requested by several departments of the University of Colorado, was supported and funded by the University Leadership Development Institute.

The need for the training arose because there is currently no standardized safety training for laboratory workers at University of Colorado campuses. As the University is a state institution, it does not fall under Federal OSHA standards and guidelines. Lab safety training is presently lab specific, face to face, and dependent on individual lab proctors, posted guidelines, safety modules or Powerpoint presentations, however university lab workers rarely review these materials. While accidents were few, lab supervisors felt many incidents were underreported, and were concerned that inconsistent safety training could lead to a future major accident. Supervisors and science faculty felt that workers needed to be offered standardized training in the safe handling of dangerous environments, equipment, and hazardous materials. The focus for the training they suggested would be on prevention, the proper use of safety equipment, and safe procedures to avoid injury. top

Situation Analysis
Learner Characteristics: Adult Learners
Learners were all individuals who may come into contact with hazardous materials, environments, or machinery through their work in University of Colorado laboratories. This varied from lab proctors and directors with many years of experience and knowledge about laboratory safety, to campus staff who are responsible for working in or near laboratory environments on campus. Learners also included students; both graduate students and undergraduate, taking laboratory safety training for the first time. Further, this training would poossibly be mandated in the future for maintenance and janitorial staff who work in lab areas. This instruction therefore, had to be a “one-size-fits-all” course, to ensure that experienced learners “unlearn” misconceptions and refresh knowledge about lab safety practices. Furthermore, the training had to provide the learners with the skills, and appropriate reference materials, needed to work safely in potentially hazardous environments, allowing staff to work in and maintain campus laboratories.
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Learner Task Analysis
There were three main areas of learner tasks:
Physical:
In this context the psychomotor tasks will be the safe handling practices with the hazardous materials and equipment. For example proper use of goggles, and masks, best adjustment for ventilation hoods, and the good habits of recapping bottles and proper labeling.
Intellectual or cognitive areas:
We will focus awareness and attention on the risk factors of materials to create discrimination about which materials or equipment requires an appropriate protocol. Further training will be in understanding the differences between hazards for example whether one is explosive, flammable, or toxic by itself or in combination, to know the proper steps to take to avoid or treat injuries.
Attitudinal:
This task will be the main focus of the course. Most lab workers already have some understanding of what materials are hazardous, however they may have become relaxed in their habits or underestimate the potential danger. Most accidents are a result of carelessness, or a “just this once” attitude that allows them to take risks leading to injury to themselves, or fellow workers. Lab personnel may be so used to working with certain materials that they have forgotten their possible toxicity over time, and need to be reminded of procedures that minimize risk.

Client Priorities
The main clients for this training were Rick Hillier, an expert in Risk Management, Steve Robison, head of the Boulder Campus hazardous waste management office, and Patti Shank, also from the Boulder campus. Steve Robison would be the main client and subject matter expert.
Our client’s prioritized tasks for the learners in descending order:
1. Shift in attitude from relaxed or habitual, to a more alert, careful and aware affect
2. Sense of shared responsibility and awareness of the interdependence of everyone in creating a safe working environment
3. Standardized understanding of hazardous materials and their dangers
4. Basic understanding of uniform procedures in handling hazards and proper use of safety equipment
5. Procedural emergency response

Learning Environment:
The training had to function as a; stand-alone, just-in-time resource that could be quickly accessed in any lab setting. Most lab workers would take the training within their own schedules, and it had to be available to new workers, as well as for experienced workers retraining, resource benefit.

Instructional Design Goals
This training had to be:

“One-size-fits-all” for a variety of learners
Provide basic lab safety information
Be interesting and compelling enough to attract learners
Offer accurate information about high-risk materials and equipment.
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Rationale for Approach:
As a result of analyzing the needs of the clients, the learners, and the learning environment, CITT decided that an online, stand alone, lab safety course would be the best method to offer accessible, standardized training to University lab workers.
Web based training would be available at lab sites, which currently all have computers and internet access, provide uniform information to the pre-determined training needs of the lab workers, and lastly offer “just in time” reference material so workers could reference specific hazards and procedures while at work.. CITT had previously been contracted to create an online Hazardous Materials course for these clients, so they were already familiar with online instruction.

Dr. Marty Tessmer, from CITT assigned the project to me. I requested my co-workers, Dana Ewald, and Brom Kim to work with me, so that we could incorporate the project into our Design Studio class, as the scheduled project, and class assignment needed to be finished by the end of the semester. Marty agreed, under the condition that I be both, the Project Manager, and the Client Manager.

Design Rationales
Course Scope
The clients requested that the course consist of two instructional modules, a lab safety reference section and a final quiz. The clients came to the CITT lab, as an opportunity for everyone to meet, to brainstorm ideas, and so that Rick Hillier could present his risk management material. We videotaped Rick’s risk management presentation as a resource to draw on when designing the module. Steve Robison planned to write the content for the other module, and send information about what topics would go in the reference section.
Over the next few days we sketched out a brief outline of the course structure.

See Course Blueprint
Anticipated Project Risks:
Risks for this project include missed deadlines, scope creep, and failed application of technology. The schedule of this project was a relatively short span to design, build, test, and deploy the course.

Project Constraints:
The course is designed for delivery to a diverse, international audience. Although most learners will access the course from campus computer labs using T1 lines, off-campus learners must be able to access a reasonably usable learning event with a 28.8 modem. While dial-up is still in use, bandwidth must be taken into account. Careful attention must be paid to insure that dial-up users are not subjected to intolerably long download times. Additionally, as this course will be accessible on the Internet, the course must be interoperable on a wide variety of hardware and browsers, to include PC and Mac.
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Results
Click on this link to see the Lab Safety Course
The project is not completed as the client discovered the content to be more complex than anticipated, and so is still writing. The deadline was extended to mid-August. The SME is updating the reference section module content as of July/03.

During the semester Dana and Brom left for full time employment. I continued to work on the project till the second week in June, meeting with the client, updating requested changes, and continued to make course improvements. I transferred the remaining edits to Jenn Light at the CITT lab after we lost our funding. When I last checked, (7/8/03) the course looked the same. Modules 1 and 2 are almost completed, with minor editing and page shifts needed. The reference section structure is completed, and most of the categories have some content in them that is waiting for SME changes. top


Evidence of Value
The original intention for this course was to create an interesting, online, self-paced, well-referenced training on lab safety. As such, it has met the need to provide lab safety training anytime, anywhere. It was designed as a stand alone, "just-in-time" opportunity for employees, faculty and students, so they could learn and update knowledge about ever changing lab safety procedures and regulations. Our client has expressed that he is satisfied with the development of the course and hopes to implement it in the fall of 2003. CITT has received feedback from evaluators and other stakeholders that the modules are well organized, interesting, and easy to navigate.

I am no longer a part of this project, or working at the CITT. Therefore, am unable to collect evidence of the success of this project from UCHSC, and Boulder campus lab researchers. If I was continuing with CITT, I would do observational research, usability studies, and content surveys from a cross section of lab workers to get feedback of the usefulness of the course. Statistics showing that lab researchers gained knowledge and skills to work safely in the laboratory would be valuable, however because the University has not collected statistics of lab incidents, there is no possibility of comparing before and after instruction impacts. Given that, I would instead choose to focus on how useful and interesting the information is to learners, asking them; “what was most memorable, helpful,” to their work, recording what features they would skip or emphasize if they were to re-do the learning modules. I’m particularly interested in finding out if the reference section is useful as a stand-alone resource for easy reference. This type of in-depth sampling of users would confirm my belief that this course will improve the safety performance of employees, faculty and laboratory students on the University of Colorado campuses. top

Reflection:
Overall I like this course and am pleased with how it has turned out so far. My biggest dissapointment and stree in working and managing this project was in not having timely content from the client. This threw off the entire scope and schedule of the project and added too much stress. Our original strategy would have worked better had this occurred, however such is life in instructional design.

The team divided the project by course module to allow each member of the group to get experience in developing the content, and designing the course in Dreamweaver. If I had to do it over again, I would prefer that each member choose a role/responsibility to complete. One person to be responsible for content, another for site development, or technology etc. This would have added to the cohesiveness of the course, made it easier to monitor individual performance. It was difficult to check co-workers progress, because each person was working on a separate module, and I tried to respect autonomy in other’s work until it became clear that we were behind on our deadlines. I also spent a lot of time at the end rewriting, editing, and fine tuning the course “voice” to make it more consistent.

Most of the difficulties with this project came from not getting timely content and updates from the client/SME. As Project Manager, I’ve learned that it is important to work more closely with the client to set a realistic schedule, posting and updating it weekly, so the client sees their role in the projects progress. Our client seemed to become somewhat disassociated early on in the process. I’m not sure if he felt overwhelmed, or burdened by the responsibilities of providing content for this course, or if he was unprepared when the co-client left the project early in the project to pursue a new career. The schedule of the project was hindered by the client’s tardiness in replying to e-mails and telephone messages. I should have met sooner with our client to re-evaluate the goals of the project. I did not do this because I didn’t want to seem pushy and irritate the client, and now see client management as a learning experience for future projects

During the front end analysis, I visited several labs, and interviewed some lab workers, supervisors, and faculty to asses training needs. I wanted to interview further members to evaluate their level of knowledge regarding lab safety practices. Our stakeholders insisted that this would not be necessary as they were aware of the knowledge and needs of laboratory workers. In future projects, I would request more access to the audience and do a more thorough learner analysis with the client before agreeing to develop the course.

One benefit to the technology we used was the CSS and templates, which I have to credit Brom with designing. I appreciated the ability to make changes to the course easily and efficiently. Brom also was crucial in helping with the structure for the reference section, and I learned a lot from working with him.

I believe one of the most valuable aspects of this tool for learners, is that I synthesized and summarized complex information from a variety of sources, and delivered it efficiently for student users. I also feel that the interactions and authentic learning experiences are beneficial for in-depth learning.

Looking back at our group dynamic I found the creative process to be stressful, frustrating, funny, and rewarding. Despite the fact that all three of us worked in the CITT lab, we had never worked on a project together, so this was a new experience. Fortunately, we learned to work together well. The biggest stress factor was the lack of timely content and communication from our client. Our team coped with this common, and difficult, problem, by researching and writing our own content. We did our best to be resourceful and continue to move forward with the course. In a short period, I believe that we were able to create a well-designed, thoughtful and meaningful online course for future laboratory users. top

Competencies:
Demonstration of Competency 2: Design instruction of human performance strategy to meet the needs of learners.
This online course meets a need for workers in CU laboratories to have accessible, useful, standardized training in safe procedures and guidelines. This course was designed to facilitate learners’ training and professional development as a just-in-time learning opportunity. As an online course, the information is available through the Internet anytime, anywhere for lab workers who need to learn more about laboratory risks, safety procedures, hazards, equipment and safe handling. The interactions are low tech by design to be independent from required plug-ins or downloads. We used text boxes, div tags, layers, and animated gifs to present a dynamic experience for learners.

Demonstration of Competency 3: Uses of variety of media to deliver instruction to students and to engage student in learning.
This course uses a variety of media and interactions to provide relevant material in an attractive, easy to use web site. We (the design team and the clients) chose to publish this course online so users could take the training at their pace and to address their own needs. We designed the course and content-learner interactions using Dreamweaver MX. We also used the Course Management System in Blackboard to track learner access and performance. We planned for the modules to operate on Blackboard, so we could use quiz builder and store results and grades in the Blackboard grade book. We also planned to use Macromedia Composer to allow the client to update content in the resource section in module three.In this project we used a variety of graphics, text and animation to illustrate the concepts being taught, simulate reality and help learners to develop the necessary skills to solve problems and prevent and respond to laboratory emergencies. Graphics were created in Photoshop 6.

Demonstration of Competency 5: Manages complex projects and resources in support of learning.
This was a complex project that demanded a high level of management, research, writing, design, and communication. As the project and client manager, I felt a lot of responsibility, especially when timelines began to slip. While I understood that I was forced to wait for the SME to deliver the content, I felt a frustrating obligation to get things done according to our schedule.

While I have managed people before in work situations, I had been identified in that role before I was hired. Managing coworkers who were as skilled as I was in area of technology and instructional design, (if not more so) made it difficult to direct and delegate responsibilities. When deadlines neared we all got irritated with each other, especially when I had to push people to keep agreements, or could not deliver needed content from the client. I had originally seen myself as a shared facilitator, but ended up having to tell people what to do, this is not my leadership strength, and I work best as a team facilitator. In this dynamic, I also realized that I wasn’t listening as well as I could have to others ideas. I learned a lot about myself as a manger, finding strengths and weaknesses in my style along the project process. The leadership conference I attended in June helped me gain confidence to be more upfront with coworkers about dealing with problems, finding shared solutions early, clearly dividing responsibilities, and helping others to manage themselves.

As a designer I found myself researching and writing content on hazards and equipment I knew nothing about just to move the project along. I helped create the project plan, template, and wrote much pf the content. In doing so, I tried to ensure that good design principles were used, such as brevity, usability, and appropriate graphics. Lastly, I used design subject matter experts (like Marty), other graduate students, and the designers involved with this project, as formative evaluators of each version during the design process. top

Bluprint for Lab Safety
Team name: Lab Safety
Project: Laboratory Safety Online Training Course
Team members: Dana Ewald, Kim Hansen and Brom Kim
Clients: Rick Hillier, Steve Robison, Patti Bonate, Ray Allen and Frank Hammitt

Use of Content
This content will be conceptual with opportunities to practice new knowledge and understanding. We are introducing methods for learners to create a framework of perceiving lab safety, going from general planning to detailed procedures and emergency responses. The content is intended for long-term retention by the learner, therefore, we will choose a learning strategy that allows the learner to work through the content from beginning to end. Authentic practice will be included throughout each module in which the learner can assess his or her own knowledge. Module 4 (the final quiz module) will consist of three to four simulated interactive lab situations that combine the information provided in module 1-3. These simulations will require the learner to apply what she/he has learned by making choices and correctly sequencing actions in order to safely complete simulated experiments and handle simulated laboratory incidents.
We are designing this course for formal learning—we will not be tracking the learner’s progress through the course, however, learners will be required to take a quiz in the form of authentic lab simulations. The results of this simulation will be recorded in Blackboard. We will state the learning objectives at the beginning of each lesson and each module will be sequential. The third module has dual roles as instruction and as a resource, which can stand alone for later reference. We will also provide learning interactions and practice opportunities in each lesson so the user may self-assess his/her own learning before taking the final quiz in module 4. Ideally (but contingent on further investigation into Blackboard) the quiz will not consist of multiple choice questions, but rather three to four simulations where the learner must correctly assess and respond to safety issues that occur during common laboratory incidents. By prompting the learner for correct choices, and reviewing previously covered material, successful completion of module 4 will require the learner to safely complete the simulated experiments, and effectively handle incidents.
Current Format of Content
The current content is in the format of lecture notes, PowerPoint slides and in the minds of our subject matter experts. Resource links on the Internet are also available. We will use this information to add depth to the content. We will collect all of this information and put it into a comprehensive online format.
Technology Platform
The course will be presented in two versions, Flash 5 and DHTML. The availability of the two versions and necessary requirements will be made clear on the splash screen. If users do not choose a version, they will be routed to the appropriate version depending on the result of a Flash 5 plug-in detection script. Both systems will require MSIE 4 or greater, and enabled Javascript. Users will be prompted, and instructed how to enable Javascript or upgrade their browser based on the result of detection scripts. The course will be designed to be functional on a 28.8 dial-up connection or faster. Netscape will not be officially supported, although users have the option of using the browser of their choice.
Types of Learning Products
At the course level, the learning product will be a tutorial. Within the overall structure, interactivity through demos and gaming simulations will be used for reinforcement. Blackboard components will be used for quiz and feedback teaching methods.

Format and Writing Style
Information and instruction will be presented via text and graphics, Flash animations, and interactions. The writing style will be conversational, asking leading questions and providing answers to reiterate the value of the content. We are introducing a large amount of information ranging from general to very specific. This wide scope is the challenge of this project. Our main focus is to give a conceptual overview, while teaching detailed procedures and responses through unique lab scenarios and activities.
The content will be developed to foster attitude and culture change in order to facilitate and maintain safe working environments. This course will not be the only training that lab workers receive. Each lab has its own unique protocols deriving from its own research processes. Hazards common to biochemistry labs will be defined in module 3. Real life stories of accidents related to these hazards will be provided when appropriate to add relevance for the learner. Emergency responses related to unique hazards will be provided when appropriate as well. The challenge is to make the content as meaningful and relevant as possible for CU lab workers. The clients requested a conceptual model to teach learners to respect safety and develop a planning process for safe lab practices. We are meeting the scope challenge by giving general instruction in modules 1 and 2 and then providing links to more specific information in module 3. All our learners work in laboratories where they may come in contact with common hazards. How the learners look at the environment and plan for working with these hazards is the main learning objective.

Course structure:
Blackboard
Upon logging into Blackboard and entering the course, the following options will be available under course documents:
Course
Self-certification/Quiz
The course will be uploaded as a complete site into the LMS. Clicking the course link will cause the course site to open in a new window. Alternately, the course may be uploaded into the different area of the server and linked from Blackboard.
Depending on further investigation and feedback from the subject matter experts and the university legal counsel, completion of this lab safety course may be based on either a quiz in the traditional format (multiple choice), or self-certification. Self-certification would consist of a two or three question Blackboard test wherein learners must attest that they have completed each module. In either case, results will be tracked, and eventually directly transmitted to the People soft HR database to become part of the learners’ permanent employee/student records. There are no consequences currently stated for not passing the instructional material, but a passing score would be required in order to certify the learner had completed the course.
Splash Screen
Course Title
Credits
Main Navigation Menu to modules 1-3
Module 1, Loss Control: Moving Beyond the Tip of the Iceberg
This module will introduce loss control. We will be using an iceberg metaphor to mirror the risk pyramid presented by subject matter expert Rick Hillard. This will help illustrate how seemingly unimportant happenings can lead to loss and more serious events. From the loss control pyramid, the module will describe the need for a safety culture and the need for proactive risk management.
Learner Objectives:
The overall objective for Module 1 is for the learners to discriminate between incidents and accidents and to identify how near misses, if left unidentified and untended, can cause accidents. Based on these ideas, the learners should feel empowered to create cultures of safety in their own laboratories, wherein potential incidents can be quickly identified and addressed.
Within module 1 we want learners to be able to:
Define incident
Define accident
Define loss
Differentiate between accidents and incidents
Using the loss control pyramid and causation model provided, identify the loss, incident, immediate cause, basic cause and lack of control of specific incidents, accidents and near misses
Recognize the importance of preventing “near misses”, not accidents
Develop positive attitude towards recognizing and reporting safety hazards
Identify potential incidents in their own work environments, and address them
If necessary, inform co-workers or supervisors of potential incidents, or hazardous practices
Interactions:
Interactions in this module will be designed to reinforce the importance of incident control. Elements of the simulated lab environment which will be used extensively in module four will be introduced at this point. Skills and concepts developed in the first two modules will have to be synthesized to successfully complete module four exercises.
Given an image of a lab environment, locate potential incidents
Make a list of potential incidents in own lab and ways to address the incident and/or report it to supervisor as necessary
Given an account of an injury loss in a lab environment, match the events or conditions in the account to the ascending levels on the loss control pyramid
Given an account of a co-worker involved in an unsafe practice, choose the correct way to handle the situationModule 2, Planning and Skills for Lab Safety and Loss Control
This module will be dedicated to the idea that any lab work should be planned from start to finish, including contingency plans, before any actual work begins. Also included will be an introduction to basic lab safety skills and concepts.
Learner Objectives:
1. Planning:
Develop own work plan from start to finish, including planning for contingencies, before starting experiments
Recall important questions to ask before starting work in a laboratory
Collect the necessary equipment and materials to plan for safety in the lab
Check for safety hazards in equipment before starting work
Demonstrate ability to read MSDS to identify hazard information when using chemicals to plan for PPE, equipment and contingencies
Demonstrate ability to read equipment and material warning labels for proper planning
2. Storage:
Demonstrate ability to recognize improper chemical storage
List guidelines for safe storage of chemicals to lessen fire risk, prevent accidental mixing, and minimize exposure
Demonstrate ability to properly separate, place and label materials to avoid loss
3. Personal Protective Equipment:
Based on MSDS, choose the correct personal protective equipment for given experiment
Based on a given experiment, use appropriate personal protective equipment including gloves, goggles, and face shields.
Given an experiment, including chemicals, choose and use the appropriate protective gloves
4. Emergency Preparedness:
Evaluate whether the appropriate emergency equipment is present in the event of an emergency before conducting an experiment
Demonstrate how to use emergency equipment including fire extinguisher, eye wash and shower appropriately and effectively
Describe where they can find emergency contacts and locations for own campus
Interactions:
More elements of the simulated lab environment will be introduced at this point.
Given an emergency scenario, select and properly sequence steps for emergency response
Given a hypothetical experiment, select the proper PPE from an extensive list of options
Given a list of chemicals, assign the chemicals to the proper storage locale
Given a lab procedure frequently performed in their own environment, make a list of potential hazards and incidents, and create a response planned for each

Module 3, Index of hazards and Corresponding Information
This module will present specific information on hazards found in biochemistry labs. Users to be directed to choose information based on the focus of their work, with a recommendation that they explore the entire module. Hazards will be indexed and linked to pages describing the material, equipment, or reaction. Recommended protocol, procedure and PPE will be described. Stories about accidents will be offered in a shadow box. Emergency responses will be given when appropriate.
Objectives:
This section of the course will concentrate on using the cognitive skills and physical processes taught in the preceding modules to handle unique hazards. The objective of this module is to acquaint the learners with an extensive array of laboratory hazards.
Module 4, Practice and Assessment
In this module, learners will be given the opportunity to practice what they have learned in the course. The interactions here will be more complex than in previous sections, and will require the learner to combine previously learned skills in the correct sequence in order to complete simulated laboratory experiments. Interactions will be based on a variety of laboratory procedures, and will include simulated emergencies and incidents. Learners will need to be able to plan research, assess risks, and respond appropriately to unexpected problems. Learners should be able to identify hazards, assess risks, choose appropriate PPE, procedures, environments; respond to unexpected occurrences, and avoid simulated injury
Learning Continuum
The continuum that best correspond to our content is location. We are referencing a place, an environment: laboratory with potential hazards, With things: Hazardous materials and equipment, and teaching recommended methods to plan and navigate safely through research processes.
Information Architecture
Introductory Page (Home Page) Intro text to the course
Links to modules 1-4
Technical requirements
Flash plug-in
Module 1 and 2 First page contains intro text to describe purpose of module- story or case study to stress importance of module information
Second page contains objectives of module/information to be covered
Pages are linked in back/next linear format- learner should review all content
Links to back, next and home (Intro page)
Pages will be numbered (i.e. page 1 of 10) to help learner estimate progress
Learner interaction will occur every 5 pages (on average)
This content is generic for many types of lab environments
Module 3 This module will contain specific information for lab equipment/hazards found in most biochemistry labs
Information is non-sequential and organized by specific hazard in order to function as both instruction and reference material
Hyperlinks will be available on first page to direct users to specific information of interest
Every link to a specific hazard will contain content describing the hazard, an example/story/case study of how the equipment/material caused an accident due to a lack of safety and an action plan for how to respond to the hazard should it present a danger
Learner interaction will occur every 5 pages (on average)
Module 4 This is where the learners will be provided with an authentic lab environment and asked to practice the skills they have learned in modules 1-3
Hyperlinks to 3-4 simulations will be provided- the learner can take these in any order must successfully complete each simulation
During each simulation, the learner must think critically and make decisions during the experiment process by answering prompted questions
The results will be posted in Blackboard
All content will be “chunked” into modules that will take no longer than 15 to 20 minutes to complete (The exception will be module 3 due to the large amount of information that it will contain). Each module will vary in length between 10 to 20 pages. The client has requested that we intersperse text with activity approximately every 5 pages—the content and needs for each module will drive this.
Plan for remediation:
Learners will have the opportunity to review content if they are having difficulty mastering it. Activities will be designed as opportunities for practice, problem solving, and review. Because the assessment is geared to teaching the material rather than discriminating between who “got it” or not, we will provide detailed feedback for incorrect answers.
Enrichment for highly motivated learners will be provided through resource links to more specific information. We will not be able to provide information on infrequently used equipment or materials (such as use of live animals), however, we will provide links to expert resources for additional information as we see appropriate.
Text, illustrations, graphics, and the manipulation of equipment/materials in simulations will provide alternate paths in this instruction.
An information map will be provided as well.
Page and screen design issues:
Each lesson will begin with a heading marked with the main focus of the content.
Each module may be branded with a small graphic in the navigation bar designed to reinforce the metaphor used in that module and help locate the user within the course, i.e. a waterline shot of an iceberg for module 1, cycle for module 2
Instructions will be complete and clear at the beginning of each lesson and before all learning interactions
Navigation will be consistent on each screen
A consistent scheme will indicate each lesson/section of the course
Tables and charts will be consistent in appearance and style
Illustrations and graphics will be properly placed and appropriate for the content on the page
Alt tags will be used on all images/graphics
Type font, including emphasis type such as bold and italic, will be consistent and properly used.
Technical Review
We will be sending review drafts by e-mail and will provide at least one-half day for the draft to reach the reviewers inbox. We will provide reviewers with at least 3 business day to review each draft (30 draft pages max.) We will ask that the draft approval is submitted two days after submission.
Meeting with Subject Matter Experts
After receiving approval for the content on module 1 and 2 and designing the interface for module 1, we will schedule an in-person meeting after receiving SME comments and making these corrections (if appropriate.) Unless we encounter significant problems, we will schedule the meeting for one hour. We will discuss questions and/or concerns and comments or suggestions that we do not intend to incorporate, but feel that we need to discuss with the rest of the reviewers.

Final Project Plan
Team name: Lab Safety
Project: Laboratory Safety Online Training Course
Team members: Dana Ewald, Kim Hansen and Brom Kim
Clients: Rick Hillier, Steve Robison, Patty Bonate, Ray Allen and Frank Hammitt

Final Business Objectives:
Create an online laboratory safety course that is available to both faculty and students at anytime, anywhere. (IS)
Provide online instruction will to allow more flexibility in the delivery of the instruction (IS)
Create a safer laboratory environment for all employees and students (IS)
Lower the number of incidents that lead to injury and/or property damage in campus laboratories. (IS/AC)
Lower future costs from injury to personnel and/or property. (AC)
Lower training costs from face-to-face training by providing training on an as needed basis. (AC)
Final Learning Objectives:
Define incident
Define accident
Define loss
Differentiate between accidents and incidents
Using the loss control pyramid and causation model provided, identify the loss, incident, immediate cause, basic cause and lack of control of specific incidents, accidents and near misses
Recognize the importance of preventing “near misses”, not accidents
Develop positive attitude towards recognizing and reporting safety hazards
Identify potential incidents in their own work environments, and address them
If necessary, inform co-workers or supervisors of potential incidents, or hazardous practices
Given an image of a lab environment, locate potential incidents
Make a list of potential incidents in own lab and ways to address the incident and/or report it to supervisor as necessary
Given an account of an injury loss in a lab environment, match the events or conditions in the account to the ascending levels on the loss control pyramid
Given an account of a co-worker involved in an unsafe practice, choose the correct way to handle the situation
Develop own work plan from start to finish, including planning for contingencies, before starting experiments
Recall important questions to ask before starting work in a laboratory
Collect the necessary equipment and materials to plan for safety in the lab
Check for safety hazards in equipment before starting work
Demonstrate ability to read MSDS to identify hazard information when using chemicals to plan for PPE, equipment and contingencies
Demonstrate ability to read equipment and material warning labels for proper planning
Demonstrate ability to recognize improper chemical storage
List guidelines for safe storage of chemicals to lessen fire risk, prevent accidental mixing, and minimize exposure
Demonstrate ability to properly separate, place and label materials to avoid loss
Based on MSDS, choose the correct personal protective equipment for given experiment
Based on a given experiment, use appropriate personal protective equipment including gloves, goggles, and face shields.
Given an experiment, including chemicals, choose and use the appropriate protective gloves
Evaluate whether the appropriate emergency equipment is present in the event of an emergency before conducting an experiment
Demonstrate how to use emergency equipment including fire extinguisher, eye wash and shower appropriately and effectively
Describe where they can find emergency contacts and locations for own campus
Given an emergency scenario, select and properly sequence steps for emergency response
Given a hypothetical experiment, select the proper PPE from an extensive list of options
Given a list of chemicals, assign the chemicals to the proper storage locale
Given a lab procedure frequently performed in their own environment, make a list of potential hazards and incidents, and create a response planned for each one.

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